Author Archive | Janine Hanrahan

Changing The Orchestral Experience

Janine HanrahanAs we move ever closer to our opening event in this our second full season of the ADO, I have been reflecting on what it is that makes the ADO a unique orchestral experience – certainly in Australia and, quite possibly, the world.

There is no question that orchestra organizations in Europe, the U.K., have noticed what we are doing and have responded enthusiastically to our activities and future plans.  I’ll have more to say about this sometime in the next month.

On the banner of our ADO Briefing ® newsletter which we curate weekly, the subtitle is The Australian Discovery Orchestra – When We Play, The World Listens.  This is both a fact: when the orchestra performs our online audience is listening from all around the world, but it is also a statement of aspiration and long-term intent.

If indeed we can continue to broaden our online audience capture then we, as an innovation-led orchestra organization, are successfully demonstrating the remarkable talents of the musicians on our roster and, simultaneously, showing to the world what fantastic Australian music sounds like! Continue Reading →

The 2017 Season Announced

Janine HanrahanHappy New Year to everyone – or “Auguri” as they say in Venice from where I am writing this post.

Today I have announced the preliminary concert schedule for the ADO’s 2017 season.  More details, including dates and venues to be announced shortly.  If you haven’t already seen it, tap here.

For the Season opening concert, we’re absolutely delighted to present Lisa Cheney’s evocative The Pool and the Star in a new version for symphony orchestra which the ADO will premiere.  The Pool and the Star, originally conceived for chamber orchestra, was first performed as part of the MSO’s Cybec program (under the direction of Brenton Broadstock) at the 2014 Metropolis New Music Festival.

The second work on the concert is the Sibelian-inspired second Symphony No. 2 ‘Romantic’ op. 30 by 20th-Century American composer, Howard Hanson (1896-1981).  Probably the best know of his seven symphonies, the work was commissioned by the Boston Symphony Orchestra’s music director Serge Koussevitsky in 1930 as part of their 50th anniversary celebrations.

This symphony became the subject of some notoriety when one of its most haunting themes was used in the closing credits of the original Alien film without the composer’s consent – much to his displeasure.  It’s a marvelous work of great beauty and not performed nearly enough.

The second concert in our season is a 50-minute thrill ride through the  ultimate music of  ‘love, murder and betrayal’ captured in Giacomo Puccini’s operatic masterpiece, TOSCA.  Whereas we’d love to play all of the opera our concerts as you know are only 50 minutes long, so we’ve selected equally the most sensuous and gripping moments to perform for you.  But don’t worry, we’re also developing a new 3D immersive game environment around Tosca’s Rome – where the opera is set – for you to explore the complete story in your own time.  Our principal conductor, Kevin Purcell, is currently in Rome preparing the media assets for this exciting new audience engagement platform.

The 2017 season kicks off  on May 7 with a special version of the ADO performing as part of Independent Schools Victoria’s Arts Learning Festival (May 3- 7).  More information about this to be posted shortly.

Lastly, just to note, we are having major issues with our Facebook page and not able to access it properly.  Basically we can’t write any posts onto our timeline right now.  We don’t know how long this will take to resolve with the ever-charming and helpful folk at Facebook!

Enjoy the remainder of the Summer,

Janine

Are We There Yet?

Janine HanrahanI thought it was a good time to reflect on the first half of our 2016-17 Season.  But, it’s over I hear you say?  No, actually, we’re only half-way through.  But I can understand the assumption that we have concluded our current season projects.

Our season starts in May each year and concludes in April-May the following year.  Odd? Perhaps, but there is a reason why we do this.  In Australia, the coming of Spring heralds the Spring Racing Carnival, the ALF Football Final series (like the American championship division finals and World Series), Melbourne Spring Fashion Week, The Melbourne Festival and the list goes on and on….

As a daring, highly-innovative and niche orchestra enterprise, we don’t want during this time to compete with all this noise – and, in reality, we can’t – so we don’t. Then, the long Australian Summer is upon us which takes us through to early February, followed by the mad scramble of people gearing up once more for School or work.  Suddenly, it’s April and wouldn’t you know it, we’re gearing up to start another ADO season.  But, wait, there’s more.  Like the eponymous free steak-knife bonus, the ADO has been busily planning during the Spring-Summer hiatus the second-half its previous calendar year season of projects.  Oh, what are they? Read on. Continue Reading →

Conducting Masterclass Participant News

The Podium

We were delighted to receive quite a number of applications for our first conducting masterclass of the season.  After reviewing all the videos received and applicant CVs and biographies, we have selected the following as active participants for the  2 x 2.5 hours rehearsals on May 27.  They are (in alphabetical order):

Joshua Geddes

Andrew Groch

Mateusz Gwizdalla

David Le Guen.

We noted, with some passing disappointment, that no applications from Australian women conductors were forthcoming!  Come on girls, it’s an occupation far too dominated by our male colleagues globally, so we hope to see you apply for the next masterclass in August?  Also, if you would like to sit in on the masterclass as an observer, we still have some places for this.

The programme for the two sessions will include all participants working on J. Strauss’s Die Feldermaus Overture with ADO Principal Conductor, Kevin Purcell, and guest conducting clinicians.  The participants then can choose from either Debussy’s Afternoon of A Faun or Copland’s famous ballet for 13 instruments, Appalachian Spring.  All these pieces present varied and challenging issues for conductors in bringing the music off the page with the orchestra to a listening audience.

Want to know more about our selected participants? Continue Reading →

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